Have You Read These Interesting Stories About Ajmer’s Dargah

From movie stars to politicians, Ajmer Sharif Dargah is the top-most destination on the list of anyone who travels to Ajmer. Although most know it is the burial site of revered saint Moinuddin Chisti, few know about the amazing stories which have occurred since then. Here are, in no specific order, our top three favourite stories revolving around Ajmer Sharif Dargah -

The First Recorded Visit Was By A Mad King

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Mohammed Bin Tughluq, the Sultan of Delhi, is also described by some as the ‘mad king’ for his disastrous strategies. The most disastrous being his decision to shift his kingdom’s capital from ‘Daulatabad’ to ‘Delhi’. The shift brought economics to a halt and also weakened his kingdom’s defences to an overwhelmingly large extent.

Interestingly, Mohammed Bin Tughluq visited Ajmer Sharif Dargah in 1932, a year before shifting his capital from Daulatabad to Delhi.

The Tomb Of An Ordinary Waterboy Lies Inside The Dargah

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In 1539, Mughal emperor Humayun was making his was way back home after a defeat from Afghan Emperor Sher Shah Suri. While crossing a river along the way, Humayun lost balance and began to drown. A water boy, named Nizam, was also present at the scene and saved the Emperor. He was so grateful towards his samaritan that Humanyun named him ‘Emperor’ for a day. Upon Nizam Saqqa’s (Saqqa meaning waterboy) death, his bones were laid to rest inside Ajmer Sharif Dargah.

Pure Vegetarian Food Is Cooked Inside

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The time when Ajmer was ruled by Mughals, Emperors Jahangir & Akbar gifted a couple of large deghs (cauldrons) to the Dargah for large-quantity cooking. Every morning, after Fajr (morning prayers), meals cooked inside the cauldrons was distributed indiscriminately among the masses, often by the emperors themselves. These meals were called niaz (offerings), and consisted rice, pasteurised butter, nuts, saffron & sugar. This practise continues to this day. With food being cooked inside the cauldrons during nightime and distributed in the morning after prayers. The cauldrons have a collective cooking capacity of 7200 kgs.

Travelling to Ajmer, Rajasthan soon? Call on +91 9468776902 for cosy, comfortable & memorable stay.

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